Redefining female sound: J McAuliffe

The MAIN REASON that Up in Smoke was ever able to exist is thanks to the constant tuning and volume correcting of sound expert J McAuliffe. The audio producing Phoenician asked listeners to re-evaluate the stereotypes they place on gender —- more specifically as it relates to sound – on this episode of Up in Smoke.

(So keep (stop) reading and listen here🙂

HEARST JOURNALISM AWARDS PROGRAM 2017
“J-editing,” a surefire future biography memoir title. TU Erin Lubin.

Re-adjusting the sound levels of what she considers a less-than-perfect microphone as she spoke during the opening of this episode, J avoided all of the compliments that Raina and I poured onto her because she can’t handle the truth (– did I mention that she is a badass superstar golden fluttering unicorn and the reason that Up in Smoke is possible? Check out this article about her winning first place at the Hearst Journalism Awards competition.)

As a sound and audio expert, J is very active in the podcast world (Literally ask her for sound help – but don’t tell her I told you that). In this episode, J talks about how her audio production skills and her point-of-view as a nonbinary person sometimes throw off listeners or those just meeting her. Reason being because her voice is considered deeper than that of your “””””average””””” (wtf that means) woman.

“Like right now (on the podcast), when you first hear my voice, and you weren’t given the pronoun ‘she’ leading up to it, and even then, for the listener there might be some sort of dissonance,” J said.

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“J-walking,” a surefire future biography sequel memoir title. TU Maria Esquinca.

The constant praise of her voice, deeper than what is considered “feminine” by societal standards, but more than welcomed in the world of radio, is what J said lead her to pursuing sound full-time as a college student.

“I pinpoint it to that, someone telling me ‘wow, you’re good at this thing’ and going on and doing that,” she said.

Now more comfortable in her position as a trans* woman, J spoke about her praised radio voice as the leading part of her gender dysphoria. She gave examples of a couple of awkward introductions and explanatory conversations with strangers who automatically assumed her gender on the show.

“When I’m ordering a coffee or any interaction with a stranger (I know what) their first impression of me is: ‘Oh, they are going to gender me as male right now,’ just because of my voice and that’s the part that kind of sucks sometimes,” J said.

Her experience with sound has only further-backed her research and exploration of the pressure placed on voices based on gender. On the show she spoke more about some of the social constructs and stereotypes that people attach to how a woman or a man is programmed to speak.

J talked about the typical ways people interpret a female voice, saying, “The way you say certain words or the way you begin a sentence and the slight little changes in inflection, like if you are going to answer things a little bit more of a question sometimes.”

Along with voice issues, she also spoke about her current answers to every outfit or appearance question that she has received as a trans* woman. J’s current approach to set stereotypes being to act as if she were the only person on the planet, ignoring prior societal expectations or “safe” answers that tend to be associated with being a trans woman in Arizona.

J also briefly spoke about the experience she had when coming out to the people around her about being trans* – first individually, then collectively, then on Facebook. The common theme of the “coming out” conversation being that the conversation usually ends up having nothing to do with her.

“I realized that coming out is not a nerve-racking experience,” and later said, “It’s more of a big deal for the person I’m telling.”

J said that the conversation switches to people thinking that this is a “big deal moment” when she is actually approaching it more casually because it’s just one voiced realization out of a million.

HEARST JOURNALISM AWARDS PROGRAM 2017
“DJ-editing,” a surefire future audiobook memoir title. TU Erin Lubin.

 

Now hoping the land an audio production job as an ASU post-graduate, J credits her audio involvement to being actively involved in ASU’s student run radio as well as the several podcasts that she has produced and hosted (keep reading……)

For those wishing to find more experience in Arizona with audio, editing and mixing she said that it is a pretty small pool of people and not a ton of resources locally for audio engineering.

“There’s not (many) opportunities for wanting to be an audio engineer, which sucks, so I think the biggest thing would be creating your own stuff,” she said.

Check out some of the work J has done, like “How to train your Jedi,”her work with Blaze Radio, the student radio station, and “In a world” the movie soundtrack podcast.

Then listen to the rapid fire round where we force J to answer the unavoidable: Earthquake or Hurricane?

Check it out!!!!!!!!!!!!

-Jamee

 

Also follow J on Soundcloud here or stalk her on Facebook here.

Redefining female sound: J McAuliffe

Advice for Arizona Photographers: Up in Smoke presents Natalie Allen

With her charming laugh and almost 80,000 Instagram followers, Natalie Allen helped Raina and I kick off the first official episode of Up in Smoke.

Highlights of the very first Up in Smoke podcast include Natalie’s awesome advice for other Arizona photographers: The Arizona native discusses her growth in photography as well as how much her success has depended on being able to collaborate with other Valley artists, putting her art out there, handling mental break downs like a champ, and learning how to schedule downtime as a freelancer.

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@natalieallenco

Listen to the podcast here or continue to read about Day 1 of Up in Smoke Episode 1 below:

On a rather busy Saturday morning Raina and I scurried to the third floor of ASU’s Walter Cronkite Building. One of the (few) perks of still being a college student is that I can take advantage of the free podcast studio equipment that my college tuition is funding.

As first-time podcasters, we expected to face a few obstacles. For this first episode, the morning began with locked doors and a lost guest…..

Luckily, everyone in our group had enough caffeine and optimism to overlook these WTF-R-WE-DOING moments, so we continued on our mission to make Up in Smoke a reality.

Both of these issues were fixed in about five seconds (more like 20 minutes) and we were able to escort out guest, Natalie, away from the ASU parking lot and towards the ASU Blaze studio (Thank you Blaze & J!), and get the first episode going.

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@natalieallenco

 

The talented photographer had been in Hawaii only 24 hours before our show, and I still have no idea why she agreed to be our first guest (WE ❤ U NATALIE) but I am beyond grateful that we are starting this podcast off right with Natalie Allen.

If Hawaiian jet lag is a thing then I will never know because Natalie was just as excited and goddess-like on the morning of our show as she was in this photo of her on a surfboard in Hawaii.

(Sidebar: Is Hawaiian jet lag a thing and if so can I go to Hawaii and then come back and cancel all of my plans because of said island jet lag or nah?)

As stated above, Natalie was more than willing to share her story about how she got started in photography, as well as advice that she has for those getting started in the business in Arizona.

If her amazing photography (which you can see on her Instagram here or on her blog here) isn’t enough, Natalie’s whole lifestyle revolves around the concept of sustainability. (Read: and she only wears sustainable clothing items).

WHICH IS AWESOME AND EVEN MORE OF A REASON TO FANGIRL HER (but be cool about it… don’t tell her I sent you).

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@natalieallenco

Again, I can’t capture all of what Raina and I found out about Natalie and her crazy behind-the-lens talents in this blog post alone ——so go listen to our first episode and find out why Natalie is one of Arizona’s magical photographing unicorns in a sea of cacti and sand.

P.S. If you want to know what type of food that unicorns eat then you should know that Natalie’s favorite cereal is “multigrain cinnamon honey-something from Trader Joe’s” and once you find that you should ship 1000 boxes to her house.

But don’t take my word for it, listen to the Up in Smoke podcast and find out for yourself!

–Jamee

 

 

Advice for Arizona Photographers: Up in Smoke presents Natalie Allen