Redefining female sound: J McAuliffe

The MAIN REASON that Up in Smoke was ever able to exist is thanks to the constant tuning and volume correcting of sound expert J McAuliffe. The audio producing Phoenician asked listeners to re-evaluate the stereotypes they place on gender —- more specifically as it relates to sound – on this episode of Up in Smoke.

(So keep (stop) reading and listen here🙂

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“J-editing,” a surefire future biography memoir title. TU Erin Lubin.

Re-adjusting the sound levels of what she considers a less-than-perfect microphone as she spoke during the opening of this episode, J avoided all of the compliments that Raina and I poured onto her because she can’t handle the truth (– did I mention that she is a badass superstar golden fluttering unicorn and the reason that Up in Smoke is possible? Check out this article about her winning first place at the Hearst Journalism Awards competition.)

As a sound and audio expert, J is very active in the podcast world (Literally ask her for sound help – but don’t tell her I told you that). In this episode, J talks about how her audio production skills and her point-of-view as a nonbinary person sometimes throw off listeners or those just meeting her. Reason being because her voice is considered deeper than that of your “””””average””””” (wtf that means) woman.

“Like right now (on the podcast), when you first hear my voice, and you weren’t given the pronoun ‘she’ leading up to it, and even then, for the listener there might be some sort of dissonance,” J said.

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“J-walking,” a surefire future biography sequel memoir title. TU Maria Esquinca.

The constant praise of her voice, deeper than what is considered “feminine” by societal standards, but more than welcomed in the world of radio, is what J said lead her to pursuing sound full-time as a college student.

“I pinpoint it to that, someone telling me ‘wow, you’re good at this thing’ and going on and doing that,” she said.

Now more comfortable in her position as a trans* woman, J spoke about her praised radio voice as the leading part of her gender dysphoria. She gave examples of a couple of awkward introductions and explanatory conversations with strangers who automatically assumed her gender on the show.

“When I’m ordering a coffee or any interaction with a stranger (I know what) their first impression of me is: ‘Oh, they are going to gender me as male right now,’ just because of my voice and that’s the part that kind of sucks sometimes,” J said.

Her experience with sound has only further-backed her research and exploration of the pressure placed on voices based on gender. On the show she spoke more about some of the social constructs and stereotypes that people attach to how a woman or a man is programmed to speak.

J talked about the typical ways people interpret a female voice, saying, “The way you say certain words or the way you begin a sentence and the slight little changes in inflection, like if you are going to answer things a little bit more of a question sometimes.”

Along with voice issues, she also spoke about her current answers to every outfit or appearance question that she has received as a trans* woman. J’s current approach to set stereotypes being to act as if she were the only person on the planet, ignoring prior societal expectations or “safe” answers that tend to be associated with being a trans woman in Arizona.

J also briefly spoke about the experience she had when coming out to the people around her about being trans* – first individually, then collectively, then on Facebook. The common theme of the “coming out” conversation being that the conversation usually ends up having nothing to do with her.

“I realized that coming out is not a nerve-racking experience,” and later said, “It’s more of a big deal for the person I’m telling.”

J said that the conversation switches to people thinking that this is a “big deal moment” when she is actually approaching it more casually because it’s just one voiced realization out of a million.

HEARST JOURNALISM AWARDS PROGRAM 2017
“DJ-editing,” a surefire future audiobook memoir title. TU Erin Lubin.

 

Now hoping the land an audio production job as an ASU post-graduate, J credits her audio involvement to being actively involved in ASU’s student run radio as well as the several podcasts that she has produced and hosted (keep reading……)

For those wishing to find more experience in Arizona with audio, editing and mixing she said that it is a pretty small pool of people and not a ton of resources locally for audio engineering.

“There’s not (many) opportunities for wanting to be an audio engineer, which sucks, so I think the biggest thing would be creating your own stuff,” she said.

Check out some of the work J has done, like “How to train your Jedi,”her work with Blaze Radio, the student radio station, and “In a world” the movie soundtrack podcast.

Then listen to the rapid fire round where we force J to answer the unavoidable: Earthquake or Hurricane?

Check it out!!!!!!!!!!!!

-Jamee

 

Also follow J on Soundcloud here or stalk her on Facebook here.

Redefining female sound: J McAuliffe

Black Laughter Matters: An interview with Comedy Historian Bambi Haggins

Labeling herself as “comedy nerd since birth,” Dr. Bambi Haggins, the author of Laughing Mad: The Black Comic Persona in Post-Soul America, joined Raina and I for episode eight of Up in Smoke.

Bambi has worked as a historical consultant for Showtime’s Why We Laugh: Funny Women and as a writer for HBO’s Whoopi Goldberg Presents Moms Mabley. She also is a PhD-vetted film and media studies professor, who teaches “Comedy as a Social Discourse,” in which students explore the ways that comedy has both directed and dissected history.

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Whoopi Goldberg + Bambi (Nbd).

“One of the things as a film and media studies teacher, sort of my raison d’etre, is to turn out conscious media makers,” Bambi told us during the show.

The class ends with the all-student comedy show, “Standing Up for Discourse,” giving many students the option to try stand-up comedy for the first time. The class comedy show also gave Bambi the opportunity to put her comedy historian skills into action, pushing her to also try standup for the first time, she said.

“I did standup for the first time at the same time that some of my students were doing it,” Bambi said.

Bambi is now in the process of writing her latest book, Black Laughter Matters, which focuses on comedy and blackness in the age of Obama and beyond. While her prior book, Laughing Mad, focused on comedy from the Civil Rights era to 2007, Black Laughter Matters is aimed to dissect what comedy has become in the last decade.

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Bambi and her dog Willow.

The result of November’s election have forced Bambi to pivot her prior narrative of Black Laughter Matters, which she spoke more about during the show.

Bambi had originally focused the book on the progressive surge for people of color as an escalating force in the last decade, but is now going back to also record the fallout to some of that power in the last few years, she said.

“When you look at the sort of ‘white-lash’ that took place, I feel like I have to go back and look for the ways in which we suspected this could happen,” Bambi said.

Nonetheless, Bambi has continued to use her position in academia and her comedy expertise to raise questions for both her students and readers about if a comedian’s mic is “a tool or a weapon.”

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She also spoke about her admiration for female queer comics of color and the current over-saturation of ‘club’ comics.

——–which you can listen to here.

Bambi ended her talk with some numbered bullet points for anyone itching to try standup but still too scared to do it, as she once faced those same obstacles:

  1. Watch as much comedy as you can.
  2. Don’t be afraid to think about what you want your comedy to convey.
  3. Do it. Do open mics, do storytelling nights, plays— any space that there’s a microphone and you can tell jokes, do it.
  4. Remember that it’s gotta come from who you are – speak your truth.

You can follow Bambi and find out updates about the release of Black Laughter Matters via Facebook.

ALSO —Raina recently released her latest documentary, Unsinkable, which focuses on four amateur comedians doing shows across the states. Check it out!

ALSO ALSO — I am currently drinking overpriced coffee in the city of dirty glitter and Skid Row — so message me if you are in town!!

–Jamee

 

 

 

Black Laughter Matters: An interview with Comedy Historian Bambi Haggins

Arizona’s hidden hero behind “Queer Girls”: Creating a more inclusive desert through photography

On the fourth Episode of Up in Smoke, Marjani Viola Hawkins was on her 47th model out of the 50 total to be shot for her first photography book, “Queer Girls.”

Queer Girls is a film photography book that Marjani has been putting all of her time and energy into in hopes of creating a more inclusive LGBTQ environment in Arizona.

“There needs to be a safe space for queer women and also queer women of color,” Marjani said.

The book focuses on any woman who does not identify as straight and gives the models involved the option to be photographed fully clothed, in their underwear, or semi-nude (Check out some of the photos here).

Marjani sat down with Raina and I and talked to us more about the creation of the book, her own experience as being a queer woman of color, and how to obtain pro-feminist socks.

Listen to Ep. 4 of Up in Smoke featuring Marjani here.

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She also spoke with us about the reactions she has received when bringing up the book in an ultra-conservative Arizona environment (shocking but it’s actually been mostly positive thus far) and some of the current challenges she has faced within Arizona’s LGBTQ ecosystem.

“There’s not really a strong, safe space place for women within the LGBTQ community, it’s very centered on the male experience and the male voice. I wanted to create something that is just for women and centered on women.”

The casting process for the women was completely open and Marjani asked anyone interested to reach out. She has since faced some backlash for the amount of white women featured in the book, but said that that was just a result of making it as inclusive as possible and that the women featured in the book were the only women who reached out to her.

Up in smoke

She also spoke briefly about one of the book’s sponsors, One*n*Ten, (One*n*Ten is a national LGBTQ nonprofit focused on empowering youth in various cities, Phoenix being one of them), and the workshop she will be doing with them over the summer.

(Listen to Episode 4 here)

We also went back in time for 2.7 minutes and Marjani talked about starting out her photographing career in high school (all in Arizona) and using her friends as models. (Fun Fact: Raina was the first girl photographed by Marjani for a webtorial in Circus Magazine and Raina is also in the Queer Girls book so GET HYPED.)

Flash forward to now and we have the hidden hero giving advice to other photographers looking to start a community-centered project in Arizona:

“You have to be extremely focused, nothing that I have ever done has just been by chance,” Marjani said.

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She also spoke about her goal of doing ten things everyday to move her career forward and some other solid creative women career advice…..but you should stop reading all of this advice and instead listen to Episode 4 here.

OR FIND OUT WHERE TO GET FEMINIST SOCKS HERE! (hehehe this is how I am tricking you once again to listen to the podcast).

And be sure to check out the Queers Girls book website here and Marjani’s amazing photography on her Instagram here.

–Jamee

Arizona’s hidden hero behind “Queer Girls”: Creating a more inclusive desert through photography